How To Pick a President

Let me preface this post by saying that my blog is NOT about to become a political discourse or an arena for people to share their ridiculous political opinions in the comments section.



Last night, millions of people watched little snippets of the Republican presidential debate, and probably far fewer actually watched the entire debate. Nevertheless, people on the conservative end of the political spectrum are starting to make choices.

It's great. I like this process. You get to know people on TV and then pretend you really know them. Yes, I'm cynical.

But seriously, I enjoy the process of learning about things, forming opinions, and testing those opinions against reality. It's called learning, and learning is important in life. I'm saying this, not to insult you (as if you don't know), but to lay the ground for the whole premise of this post:

Americans need to start thinking critically.

That doesn't me be critical.

Any moron can criticize things he doesn't understand.

Thinking critically means analyzing what you perceive to be true and putting it to the test. 

Hold your ideas in the fire every once in awhile and see what burns away.

Ask tough questions and be honest enough, with yourself and with others, to answer them truthfully.

I did not write this post to endorse a candidate, or to hint at a potential winner. I have no idea who will win, but I am trying to gain a better understanding of the process.

What I have come to believe is that the winners of these types of debates/elections is a direct reflection of the capacity of the American people to use the billions of neurons between their ears.

That's how it works. The Democratic and Republican committees hire think tanks to figure out how their voter base thinks and then engineers a mold that a potential candidate must fit in order to be "electable."

Therefore, if you wish to change the nominees, you must change how people think, which will change how think tanks present information to committees that elect candidates.

For some of you, this is kindergarten stuff. For others, your mind was just blown. 

"Did you say I, little old me, can influence the nomination of Presidents? No. Not me."

But yes, you.

America should be a place where the people carry the power, and we grant it to our leaders when they convince of their worthiness.

Therefore, it is really up to us to think.

It's up to us to think about why we think things.

It's up to us to determine if our thinking is justifiable, or if it's merely a product of ambient absorption of mainstream fluff.

What do you think?

Do you care?

If you do, then start exercising your mind.

When you hear words flow out of a candidate's mouth, analyze them. 

Consider the implications. 

Question whether it's feasible, whether it's true, and whether he/she will have any ability to deliver on it.

If you don't understand much about politics, fine. Just start analyzing them like you analyze your friends and family. Look at their facial expressions and judge their sincerity. 

It's okay to judge. That's our job as citizens--to judge candidates.

My greatest fear for the future of this country is not that this person or that person will get elected.

My greatest fear is asking, "Why did this person get elected?"

Consider why Germany put Hitler in power.

Ask why the North Koreans allowed Kim Jong-un to lead them.

Why was Stalin allowed to take power in Russia?

I realize these countries were not democracies or republics, but the people still had a choice whether to revolt or concede. 

And why did they concede? 

I think because the general populace did not understand what was happening. They did not know what was afoot. They were unaware, uninformed, and complacent with allowing leadership that never should have been allowed.

You don't need to get political, but you should get informed.

And as you become informed, you should check what you observe against what you know. Sure, you could be wrong once in awhile, but that's okay; that's part of learning too.

In the end, I hope this post motivates a few people to become better citizens, better voters, and more skeptical of people who are vying for power and influence.

"Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom; and with all your getting, get understanding." (Proverbs 4:7)

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Image obtained from http://www.austinimmigrationlawyerblog.com/2014/11/obamas-immigration-executive-a.html

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